More staff needed to handle Canadian telecom complaints

A few days ago, we posted about the Commission for Complaints for Telecom-Television Services being hit with an increase of complaints about consumer’s telecom services – mainly their wireless contracts. As it turns out, the CCTS is hiring more staff to handle this growing volume of dissatisfaction. CCTS commissioner Howard Maker spoke of the 73 percent increase with the CBC, saying, “It’s disappointing. Obviously there are challenges – miscommunication, misunderstandings, poorly written documents. It’s a bit frustrating.” Maker thinks that part of the reason for the complaint surplus is heavier telecom coverage in the media, which has directed Canadians towards

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FCC ousts net neutrality in controversial vote

On Thursday, December 14th the Federal Communications Commission voted to repeal the 2015 net neutrality rules, meaning less oversight and regulations for broadband and wireless carriers and ISPs. As explained by CNET, the 2015 laws “ensured all traffic on the internet is treated equally, and prevented broadband and wireless providers from blocking or slowing online content.”  These regulations were removed, as was the legal foundation which gives the FCC oversight over ISPs. Responses to the vote are passionately mixed. One commissioner, Brendan Carr, called the vote “a great day for consumer, for innovation, and for freedom.” While another, Mignon Clyburn,

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Schooley Mitchell complaints

The CRTC banned unlocking fees: here’s how that affects the average Canadian

As of December 1, 2017, Canadian telecom companies will no longer be able to carrier-lock phones or charge customers unlocking fees. This CRTC ruling is a big win for not only the Liberal government, who promised telecom reform back in 2015, but also the consumers who will undoubtedly benefit from the new regulations. In 2016, carriers like Rogers, Telus, and Bell made $37.7 million CAD in unlocking fees. That’s a lot of money from the pockets of consumers. And while it might seem like taking that income away from the carriers might impact them negatively, Mobile Syrup points out that

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Joe Natale is the new CEO of Rogers Communications

As of April 19, Rogers is welcoming Joe Natale as its new CEO. According to MobileSyrup, this follows the dismissal of Guy Laurence from the role last year, when Natale could not take over due to his non-complete contract with Telus. Although that contract was not set to expire until July, Rogers said in a statement that it has reached “a confidential agreement” with Telus “to secure his early arrival.” “I’m really excited to join the Rogers team,” said Natale in a statement sent to MobileSyrup. “The history of the company, the incredible mix of assets, and the growth potential

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VoIP is Taking Over

VoIP has become a standard part of the telecom and business world, and it’s only getting bigger. According to IHS analytics, the global VoIP market rose five percent to $73 billion in 2015. This growth is attributed, at least in part, to businesses and the diverse network of suppliers. Suppliers don’t have just businesses to thank for the market growth, however. Residential VoIP use remains a major player, accounting for 62 percent of 2015 revenue. At the end of 2015, there were 230 million residential VoIP users. VoIP isn’t the only service with significant growth. Similarly, use of SIP trunking,

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Textalyzer Could Crack Down on Distracted Driving

Careless drivers are always quick to deny using their phone during a crash. Soon law enforcement officials may be able to prove a driver was fiddling with their screen thanks to the Textalyzer. “Just like police use a breathalyzer to check your blood alcohol level, the Textalyzer checks your phone activity and crucially, ascertains if you were using it at the time of the incident being investigated,” states a Digital Trends article by Bruce Brown. “That’s bad news if you’re in a state, county, or town where phone use while driving is illegal. Even where hands-on cell phone usage isn’t

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What is Your Communications Contingency Plan?

Forty-two degrees, no electricity, the slightly audible hum of a hard drive on a fully charged laptop, and – thanks to my camping stove – a hot cup of coffee in an otherwise dark and quiet home office. Cell phone? Check. Internet connectivity? Through the cell phone hot spot, check. Office phone lines and fax available? Because of unified communications, check. Can clients and associates reach me? Yes, but only if they have a contingency plan for their communications needs when systems fail. A week of power loss due to the most damaging windstorm on record in the greater Spokane

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Is Verizon Data This Season’s Hot Gift?

If you’re looking for something unique to put under the tree this year, Verizon data may be what you need. The United States’ largest carrier has just announced its subscribers can send 1 GB of data as a gift this holiday season. It’s like giving your friend or family member 3,000 web pages, 13,000 emails or three hours of content streaming for just $10. Verizon is updating its Messages app for Android to include a way to send data to your contacts. If you’re not a user of Verizon Messages, you can also purchase the data through the carrier’s website.

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Schooley Mitchell complaints

Agency May Soon Oversee Cable TV Complaints

Are you a Canadian with a telecom complaint? If you’re mad and informed enough you may take it all the way to the Commissioner for Complaints for Telecommunications Services (CCTS). If you don’t know about this watchdog, you should: the CCTS handles over 10,000 complaints per year and can force providers to pay consumers up to $5,000 in the event of a billing error. That’s $5,000 in compensation over and above the amount of the error to be refunded. Have we told you some studies show up to 80 percent of telecom bills contain errors? Do the math. I bet

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BYOD on the Decline?

For the last few years people have been pumping up Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) programs as the best solution for employees and businesses alike. However, those same people weren’t always quick to acknowledge the well-documented issues often surrounding it. It appears the tide may be turning. The results of a 2015 CompTIA Information Technology Association survey of American IT professionals show over half work at companies that have banned BYOD. In total, 53 percent of the 375 respondents said their company does not allow the use of personal devices in the workplace, a significant increase from 34 percent just

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