Schooley Mitchell complaints

Agency May Soon Oversee Cable TV Complaints

Are you a Canadian with a telecom complaint? If you’re mad and informed enough you may take it all the way to the Commissioner for Complaints for Telecommunications Services (CCTS). If you don’t know about this watchdog, you should: the CCTS handles over 10,000 complaints per year and can force providers to pay consumers up to $5,000 in the event of a billing error. That’s $5,000 in compensation over and above the amount of the error to be refunded. Have we told you some studies show up to 80 percent of telecom bills contain errors? Do the math. I bet

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emergency 911

Schooley Mitchell lawsuit watch: 911 challenge

In this week’s Schooley Mitchell Lawsuit Watch, we bring you news of a $214 million storm brewing on the east coast over 911 system fees. It’s the latest legal challenge filed by Alabama-based company Phone Systems Recovery, this time alleging Massachusetts phone companies are pocketing emergency call system fees instead of handing them over to the government. According to a Boston Globe article, the lawsuit was filed in Superior Court based using whistle-blower statutes. The company that filed on behalf of the state stands to receive a portion of the settlement if successful. Phone System Recovery president Roger Schneider alleges

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Facebook Hacker Pleads Guilty

Eric Crocker of Binghamton, N.Y. was one of a dozen people charged this summer for his participation in a hacking forum known as Darkode. The 29-year-old recently pleaded guilty in a U.S. District Court to violating the CAN-SPAM Act. Crocker operated under the pseudonym “Phastman” and used a hacking tool called Facebook Spreader, which infected Facebook-connected PCs and turned them into bots. Crocker profited by selling access to his bots, which scammers then used to send out massive amounts of spam. The virus was designed to send a Facebook message to the affected users’ friends with an attached malware file

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Apple Loses Lawsuit in Taiwan

A Taiwanese court has ruled against Apple in a lawsuit that could potentially set a concerning precedent for the iPhone maker. Apple was accused of engaging in anti-competitive practices by forcing carriers in the country to assign pricing on its iPhones. This covers the iPhone 4, 4S, 5, and 5S models. The case has been ongoing since 2013, when it was first brought up by the Taiwan Fair Trade Commission (FTC). The Commission said that Apple was acting unfairly by forcing the country’s three major carriers to comply with its own pricing and associated plans. In the final ruling, Apple

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ITC Judge Finds Microsoft Guilty of Patent Infringement

Microsoft has lost the first round in a battle against InterDigital Inc, as United States International Judge found Microsoft guilty of using InterDigital’s patented technology in its smartphones without consent. The litigation took place at the International Trade Commission, where Judge Theodore Essex ruled Microsoft had infringed on two wireless cellular patents owned by InterDigital, a company specializing in the design and licensing of technologies to third parties. Essex has also proposed a possible ban, stating it would not be against users interest to prohibit the importation of Microsoft devices into the United States. It remains to be seen if

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ESPN Sues Verizon Over New Pay TV Offering

ESPN, a subsidiary of Walt Disney Co., has filed suit against Verizon for breach of contract relating to Verizon’s new pay TV plan. Legal documents sent to the Supreme Court of New York State claim Verizon violated its obligations “under certain license agreements.” Traditional subscriptions require customers to pay for a large group of networks often including ESPN, whereas Verizon’s new pay TV package offers customers smaller genre-specific channel packs such as sports, kids or news. Media companies that focus on sport content, such as ESPN, are alleging these packages violate their contract with Verizon. “ESPN is at the forefront

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AT&T Sues FCC Over Net Neutrality

AT&T recently filed a lawsuit against the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), seeking to overturn its net neutrality ruling, which was just published in the Federal Register. AT&T joins the National Cable & Telecommunications Association, United States Telecom Association, American Cable Association, and the CTIA in their efforts to change the FCC’s decision. These associations allege the new rules are “arbitrary and capricious, and violate federal law.” The main complaint shared by these groups is regarding the FCC’s decision to view the Internet as a telecommunications service, as opposed to a utility like phone services. AT&T has stayed out of previous

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Tennessee Sues FCC Over City-Run Internet

The state of Tennessee is suing the FCC to overturn its recent city-friendly decision to dismantle laws that restrict municipalities from supplying broadband and competing with private companies such as AT&T and Comcast. The FCC recently re-classified broadband Internet as a utility, effectively declaring it as a right for every American and, at the same time, dismantled laws restricting competition. Now, while the broadband industry is suing the FCC to stop net neutrality rules, the state of Tennessee is also claiming the FCC “has unlawfully inserted itself between the State of Tennessee and the State’s own political subdivisions,” calling it

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Class-Action Lawsuit Against Google Dismissed

The antitrust lawsuit filed against Google regarding Android handsets has been dismissed in a California court. Two complaints filed by U.S. consumers sought a class-action lawsuit against Google, alleging anti-competitive practices in the mobility market. The lawsuit accused the tech giant of forcing the use of Google-related apps on Android devices, and that its Mobile Application Distribution Agreement (MADA) allowing device manufacturers to use its free Android mobile operating system “stifles innovation and diminishes consumer choice”. When handset makers such as Samsung or HTC wish to install Android on their devices, the companies must agree to a MADA, stipulating Google

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Apple Wins Decade-Long Suit

A U.S. federal jury has sided with Apple in a class-action lawsuit which could have cost the company up to $1 billion. The case, which had been going on for nearly a decade, dealt with Apple allegedly blocking songs downloaded from rivals from playing on iPods. The lawsuit, filed in 2006, claimed Apple locked users into its ecosystem by blocking songs from competitors and charging more for songs than others would have. The trial, which took place over two weeks at a U.S. District Court in Oakland, California, ended in a unanimous verdict amongst the eight jurors. “We thank the

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